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Fiona Hall, Big Game Hunting

April 2, 2013 12:00 am to July 21, 2013 12:00 am

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One of Australia’s most prominent contemporary artists, Fiona Hall, is best known for extraordinary works that transform mundane man-made materials into vital organic forms with both contemporary and historical resonances. Her work is crafted with painstaking detail, emphasising the beauty and fragility of the natural world and by way of engaging with environmental issues, colonialism, consumerism and globalisation.

‘Fall Prey’ features a menagerie of trophy-style sculptures of endangered species from the United Nations Red List, rendered in military camouflage. While resembling old-style taxidermied specimens, these larger-than-life creatures are embellished with the detritus of contemporary culture – disturbing signifiers of the cultural and ecological changes that have wrought havoc on their natural habitats and contributed to their plight.

Heide Museum of Modern Art
Until 21 July, 2013
Melbourne

I Want Change: Two decades of artistic defiance, disapproval and dissent

April 2, 2013 12:00 am to April 12, 2013 12:00 am

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Michael Agzarian |Brook Andrew | Zanny Begg | boat-people.org | Bindi Cole | James Dodd | Fiona Foley | Jamin | Ash Keating | Deborah Kelly | Azlan McLennan | MEEK | Van Rudd | Carl Scrase

Exhibition at LUMA

A shadowy figure sits cross-legged against a wall. Hands outstretched, he holds a placard above a beggar’s cup, scrawled with the text, “KEEP YOUR COINS, I WANT CHANGE.” MEEK’s iconic stencil, Begging for Change, sums up a sentiment that experienced a groundswell in contemporary art practice in Australia during the Howard era and has maintained an active presence to the current day. The War on Terror, our treatment of refugees, the environment, Indigenous identity and the GFC have each figured prominently as political issues that have occupied artists and their practices over the past 15 years. I Want Change takes a snapshot of these issues and the often public, performative and socially engaging working embraced by artists to voice their protest, criticism and concern.

Image credit: Begging for Change
Stencil, dimensions variable
Image courtesy of the artist

Inkahoots

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In 2012 Inkahoots celebrated it’s 20th anniversary – quite a milestone for a studio that began life as a left-wing, artist run, community access screen printing studio. Indeed the studio as it’s become known today has changed and mutated significantly since it’s founding, however it has always stuck to it’s objectives and philosophy which is simply led by (in their own words) “creative political expression and creative self management”.

Read the rest of this inspiring article here Desktop

 

A Roving Capital Idea for Australia

In Stage 1 of the CAPITheticAL competition, we proposed the idea of a roving capital. The capital would move to a new location every fifteen years to address a particular national issue.

We presented this idea over 4 newspaper pages – each page a moment in the process – the idea, the engagement and events, the first day in the new capital and finally, the legacy left behind. We chose Currumbin in the Gold Coast as the first roving capital, which would address the issue of climate change and explore what an eco-city would be like.

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View our full Stage 1 submission here

For Stage 2, our team from David Lock Associates, here studio and ARUP decided to actually go to Currumbin to act out this process – we wanted to see what would happen, who we might meet, and what we might learn.


filmmaker Natalie Erika James Continue reading “A Roving Capital Idea for Australia”