Floor Talk: Touch me not – The sculptural installations of Ranjani Shettar

December 10, 2011 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm

Speaker Natalie King, Director, Utopia, The Asialink Centre, The University of Melbourne

Ranjani Shettar creates installations and sculptures using diverse media, making works that challenge the categorical separation between craft and sculpture. Her work stands in the thresholds between art and craft, tradition and modernity, the physical and the ethereal. ‘

In the catalogue of How Latitudes Become Forms in 2003 Douglas Fogle writes: ‘Shettar constructs sculptural artifacts that speak obliquely to the effects of urbanization in newly high-tech Bangalore. By using a formal language that invokes the organic and a material language that suggests the industrial, she operates in a manner similar to that of Bangalore itself, where industrial urbanization is colliding with (and collapsing into) the once rural countryside. But above all else, Shettar’s work asks phenomenological questions about the way in which we inhabit particular spaces in our built environment.’

Where: NGV International. 180 St Kilda Road

When: December 10 at 12.30

To book: http://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/whats-on/programs/public-programs/floor-talk-touch-me-not-the-sculptural-installations-of-ranjani-shettar

2112 Imagining the Future – RMIT Gallery

Stephen Haley. One Second (Plastic Water Bottles 5982) 2010. Lightjet photograph 2/5, 120 x 120cm

Opening  6-8 pm Thursday 1 December 2011

With a special address by:Professor Paul James Director of the Global Cities Institute (RMIT) and Director of the United Nations Global Compact Cities Programme.

Exhibition dates 2 December 2011 – 28 January 2012

What will the world look like 100 years from now?

Featuring artists:

PHILIP BROPHY, JUSTINE COOPER, KEITH COTTINGHAM, THOMAS DOYLE, LESLEY DUXBURY, KELLYANN GEURTS, STEPHEN HALEY, KIRSTEN JOHANNSEN, SAM LEACH, TONY LLOYD, YVES MARCHAND AND ROMAIN MEFFRE, MARIKO MORI, HISAHARU MOTODA, LYNDAL OSBORNE, PATRICIA PICCININI, PHILIP SAMARTZIS, ROMAN SIGNER, SUPERFLEX, DEBBIE SYMONS, STEPHANIE VALENTIN, DARREN WARDLE, KENJI YANOBE, KEN + JULIA YONETANI + NOW AND WHEN: AUSTRALIAN URBANISM

Admission free. RSVP  03 9925 1717 / rmit.gallery@rmit.edu.au

RMIT Gallery 344 Swanston Street Melbourne 3000
Tel: +61 39925 1717 Hours: Mon-Friday 11-5 Saturday 12-5
Closed Sundays and public holidays. Lift Access. Free Admission.
Email: rmit.gallery@rmit.edu.au  www.rmit.edu.au/rmitgallery

Beach coming soon to Brunswick

Artists Sonja Hornung and Richard Pettifer are bringing the beach to Brunswick to prepare the City of Moreland for the rising sea levels.  Expect the world’s longest ever game of Climate Change “Risk”, a mini-Ute Muster, a new model of democracy through improvised music, and more. Everyone is invited to stand with us on our sunny shore and contribute to the conversation.

Open during daylight hours

Sun Nov27th – Sun Dec 4th

Outside the Mechanics’ Institute

Cnr Glenlyon & Sydney Rds, Brunswick, Melbourne

Further details: brunswickbeach.wordpress.com

Open Studio @ Artspace – Vincent JF Huang

Friday 11 and Saturday 12 November 11am-5pm.

During the course of his eight week residency which is supported by the Council for Cultural Affairs, Taiwan Vincent has embarked on a new body of work entitled The Atlantis Project.

The Atlantis Project uses an aquarium tank to house coral reefs growing on miniature sculptures of iconic landmarks of civilized and capitalist society. With the concept of creating a modern day Atlantis city, where all that is known to civilized mankind will be flooded over by the rising sea levels. The corals are free to develop and grow until all its resources within the aquarium are fully consumed, and eventually inducing a coral bleaching event where they die off. Under the microcosm of the aquarium, the project wishes to show metaphorically the limitations of Mother Earth’s resources. As a subset of the Earth’s vast system, the human behavior of unrelentingly seeking for infinite growth will inevitably lead to extinction.

The Open Studio will also showcase paintings from Huang’s climate change series.

Artspace Sydney 43 – 51 Cowper Wharf Road
Woolloomooloo NSW

More information: Vincent J.F. Huang

2011 Western Australian Environmental Art Awards Exhibition

CCWA is proud to present the inaugural Western Australian Environmental Art Awards Exhibition.

The exhibition will showcase art work reflecting the WA environment and key environmental themes and will run from Saturday 22nd October to Saturday 5th November.

EAA2_0.jpg Leaves – Susie Waller                  
 Location:
Perth City Farm
1 City Farm Place
EAST PERTH – just a couple of minutes walk from Claisebrook station! 

Exhibition opening times:
Saturday and Sunday: 9.00am to 5.00pm
Monday closed
Tuesday to Friday: 10.00am to 4.00pm

For further information, please call (08) 9420 7266 or email conswa@ccwa.org.au.

           
 Visit the exhibition and win a great prize!

 

Diana Thater: Chernobyl

Saturday 22 October 2011 to Saturday 04 February 2012

Opening Saturday 22 October 2011 5-7pm
Los Angeles artist Diana Thater is famous for her audacious video installations that deconstruct the language and mechanics of video as a medium while exploring the relationship between human beings and the natural world (particularly animals). The highlight of our show is her new six-channel video installation Chernobyl (2010).

In 1986 the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the northern Ukraine exploded. It allegedly released 100 times more nuclear debris than the Hiroshima bomb and was responsible for the deaths and illnesses of thousands of people. Today, the city of Pripyat, where the
powerplant workers lived, is a ghost town. Although completely deserted by humans, wild animals are settling there. Przewalski’s Horses, facing extinction in their native habitat in central Asia, now roam freely in this post-apocalyptic, post-human landscape.
Thater filmed in Pripyat, within the forbidden ‘alienation zone’, observing animals against the decomposing architecture.

Thater writes: ‘Chernobyl is falling into ruins, but still looks like a city; there are stores, apartment buildings, schools. Even though it’s deserted and falling apart, animals are moving into the city. On the one hand, you have a perfectly preserved Soviet city from
1970; on the other hand, this post-apocalyptic landscape where animals are living. Chernobyl represents the failure of a massive political system, a way of life, and of science. Yet nature continues to persist. Not because it wants or chooses to, but because it must.’ In addition to Chernobyl, we will be showing Thater’s installations Peonies (2011), Untitled Videowall (Butterflies) (2008), and Pink Daisies, Amber Room (2003).

Diana Thater is represented by 1301PE, Los Angeles, and Hauser and Wirth, London.