Cross (X) Species Film: Invitation to a special screening

August 15, 2012

Carbon Arts invites you to an intimate screening of our newly completed short documentary film Cross(x) Species Adventure Club: Australian Safari, starring New York based environmental artist extraordinaire, Natalie Jeremijenko, and her collaborator chef, Mihir Desai.

The film takes us on a foodie journey from rural Victoria to Melbourne, featuring vodka+soil tasting with farmers, snail races at the Arc One Gallery and edible cocktails for amphibians at the Melbourne Museum. All part of a quest to invent foods that reinvent our relationship with other species and promote environmental health!

Please join us for drinks and then choose from two different show times at Loop Bar in downtown Melbourne. The film runs for 25 minutes.

Location: Loop Bar, 23 Myers Place, Melbourne. Tickets are $10. Entry at 6pm

To secure your seat in the small theatre, book online: http://www.trybooking.com/BQNZ

 

Film Screening THE LAST SURVIVOR 31st May @ Bella Union

Arts in Action invites you to its inaugural Social Action Film Night @ Bella Union with a screening of The Last Survivor, a character-based documentary that presents the stories of genocide Survivors and their struggle to make sense of tragedy by working to educate, motivate and promulgate a civic response to mass atrocity crimes. Following the lives of survivors of four different genocides and mass atrocities – The Holocaust, Rwanda, Darfur, and Congo – The Last Survivor presents a unique opportunity to learn from the lessons and mistakes of our past in order to have lasting social impact on how we act collectively in the face of similar issues today. BOOK ONLINE @ Bella Union

“Each Survivor’s story is one of triumph over trauma, and we hope that audiences respond to their courage and perseverance as much as we have. When we made the film, our objective was not to dwell on the tragedies of the past, but rather to understand how we can prevent atrocities in the future.” Michael Pertnoy, the film’s Co-Director

Having shot on location in five countries across four continents, the film asks its audience to consider genocide as an atrocity that has occurred on nearly every single continent and one that affects all of us as human beings. By presenting these stories of loss, survival, and hope side by side, the film highlights the commonalities these individuals share both as Survivors and, more broadly, as human beings.

“It is impossible not to be moved and inspired by what each of them has been able to accomplish despite the tragedies they have endured”

Continue reading “Film Screening THE LAST SURVIVOR 31st May @ Bella Union”

2112 Imagining the Future – Public Programs

November 30, 2010 to December 6, 2010

Stephen Haley One Second (Plastic Water Bottles 5982) 2010
Lightjet photograph 2/5, 120 x 120cm

Wednesday 30 November 5.45 – 8.30pm Kaleide Theatre RMIT Zones of the Future: Dystopia or Utopia? Screening of the Russian science fiction masterpiece Stalker (1979), directed by Andrei Tarkovsky. Includes refreshments and panel discussion featuring curator Linda Williams with guests including Philip Brophy and Kenji Yanobe.

Friday 2 December 12 – 1pm RMIT Gallery – From Organic to Atomic. Curator Linda Williams in conversation with Lyndal Osborne and Kenji Yanobe

Tuesday 6 December 12-1pm RMIT Gallery – Painting the Future. Discussion with Sam Leach and Tony Lloyd

Bookings for all events essential Tel 9925 1717

What could a sustainable neighbourhood in Melbourne look like? Visioning 2032

What could a sustainable neighbourhood in Melbourne look like?  How could we transform a number of our existing urban communities through design ‘interventions’?  If we are to develop low-carbon resilient suburbs in Melbourne, we need to have some vision of what a desirable future living scenario is, and the changes we can make today to set us on a path there. These films are a glimpse of that potential future.  The animated films are a culmination of four years’ worth of work by students and staff from Swinburne University, RMIT University, Monash University and the University of Melbourne, as well as from Melbourne design professionals.  Each presents a different area of sustainable design innovation. These include new infrastructure schemes for water, food, energy and public transport, along with innovative design strategies for suburban development and new local employment opportunities.

View the films  http://www.ecoinnovationlab.com/component/content/article/116-visioning-2032-city-of-short-distances/397-visioning-2032-films

Diana Thater: Chernobyl

Saturday 22 October 2011 to Saturday 04 February 2012

Opening Saturday 22 October 2011 5-7pm
Los Angeles artist Diana Thater is famous for her audacious video installations that deconstruct the language and mechanics of video as a medium while exploring the relationship between human beings and the natural world (particularly animals). The highlight of our show is her new six-channel video installation Chernobyl (2010).

In 1986 the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the northern Ukraine exploded. It allegedly released 100 times more nuclear debris than the Hiroshima bomb and was responsible for the deaths and illnesses of thousands of people. Today, the city of Pripyat, where the
powerplant workers lived, is a ghost town. Although completely deserted by humans, wild animals are settling there. Przewalski’s Horses, facing extinction in their native habitat in central Asia, now roam freely in this post-apocalyptic, post-human landscape.
Thater filmed in Pripyat, within the forbidden ‘alienation zone’, observing animals against the decomposing architecture.

Thater writes: ‘Chernobyl is falling into ruins, but still looks like a city; there are stores, apartment buildings, schools. Even though it’s deserted and falling apart, animals are moving into the city. On the one hand, you have a perfectly preserved Soviet city from
1970; on the other hand, this post-apocalyptic landscape where animals are living. Chernobyl represents the failure of a massive political system, a way of life, and of science. Yet nature continues to persist. Not because it wants or chooses to, but because it must.’ In addition to Chernobyl, we will be showing Thater’s installations Peonies (2011), Untitled Videowall (Butterflies) (2008), and Pink Daisies, Amber Room (2003).

Diana Thater is represented by 1301PE, Los Angeles, and Hauser and Wirth, London.